Call Me

I grew up in the era of vigilant texting and MSN messenger offline messages. 

What a waste of time. Yet, that was the only way to remain connected and to occupy all the unnecessary amount of time I had in my hands.

After school, we would ask each other to come online at a certain time on MSN so that we could chat. This was before all of us got our hands on a cellphone; eventually, our fingers would learn to press the keypad faster than the speed of light. Our parents marveled at our newly acquired skill, and after few years, they jumped on the bandwagon as well. 

From MSN/Windows messenger, we moved to the era of pre-social media. 

This is how it started:

You should get a Myspace. All of us have a Myspace. It's so cool. You should get a Myspace. Why do you not have a Myspace? Do you still do that thing, that blog thing? What the heck is a blog? You should get a Myspace. All of us have one. Hey, if you add me on Myspace, then I'll add you back. Please get a Myspace. Myspace. Myspace. Myspace. Myspace. Myspace. Myspace. Myspace. Myspace.Myspace. Myspace. Myspace. MYFACE. Myspace.Myspace. Myspace. Myspace. Myspace.Myspace. Myspace. Myspace. Myspace.Myspace. Myspace. Myspace. Myspace.Myspace. Myspace. Myspace. Myspace.Myspace. Myspace. MYFACE. Myspace. Myspace. Get a Myspace. Myspace. Myspace. Myspace.

So, I got a Myspace. 

I put up carefully, curated selfies on it. You know, I had to portray myself as the creative one. Finding the right label for yourself is part of the individuation stages of a teenager.  

Everything was so curated. 

My layout. My pictures. My font. My banner. My bio. 

If you were to label me at the time, then I'd probably be a hipster. No, really. I had a size 7pt font in georgia, and my letters were -0.75pt. That's what all the hip kids had, an unreadable Myspace profile. 

The internet became a stage for everyone. She left comments on my photos, so I returned them on her photos. On and on and on... What was the point?  It was just another way to socialize. For someone with social anxiety (like me at the time), this was an easy way for people to know me. 

Oh, your layout is cool. Can you do mine?

Oh, your pictures are interesting and cool. 

Oh, your bio is funny. 

It got the job done. 

Then, my classmates got bored with Myspace, and moved to Facebook. 

Shikha, get a Facebook. Everyone has a Facebook. You should get a Facebook. We can keep in touch when I go to college through Facebook. Get a Facebook. Oh, you don't have a Facebook? Get a Facebook. Facebook is cool. Get a Facebook. I have a Facebook, why don't you?Get a Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. FACEbook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. FACEbook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. Facebook. 

So, I got a Facebook, and it was so boring. 

At the time, we didn't have to like anyone's photo. Everyone was competing for comments. 

How many comments do you have on your profile picture? I have ___________. 

The height of narcissism was at it's peak, and I sat there wondering why Facebook was so boring. 

The same process was repeated. She commented on my pictures, and I commented back on hers. On and on and on and on and on... 

Texting increased as Facebook got redundant. It was much easier to send out a message then to have a conversation. 

Our statements changed to:

Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. Text me. 

After college, the lack of closeness we received from communicating through social media and texts led us to think about what we needed right now from our relationships. 

While our parents were enjoying reconnecting with their friends on social media, we started calling each other a lot more than we used to. Our ten minutes conversation were much more valuable than the one year communication we had on social media. 

Our statements simply changed to:

Call me.